Two fashion brands acknowledge models of different shapes and sizes

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Two fashion brands acknowledge models of different shapes and sizes

Aphrodite, the Greek Goddess of love and beauty, looks at her body’s reflection - the way that women reflect on their bodies to see if they conform to society’s views of beauty.

Aphrodite, the Greek Goddess of love and beauty, looks at her body’s reflection - the way that women reflect on their bodies to see if they conform to society’s views of beauty.

Photographer: Nancy Rivera

Aphrodite, the Greek Goddess of love and beauty, looks at her body’s reflection - the way that women reflect on their bodies to see if they conform to society’s views of beauty.

Photographer: Nancy Rivera

Photographer: Nancy Rivera

Aphrodite, the Greek Goddess of love and beauty, looks at her body’s reflection - the way that women reflect on their bodies to see if they conform to society’s views of beauty.

Written by Nancy Rivera, Student Writer

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Kering and LVMH, two exclusive fashion brands, announced on September 6 that a new work requirement was made for their models. The companies have been criticized for hiring models with unrealistic body standards, so the new requirement would allow models of all shapes and sizes to work for them.

This requirement became a law in France in 2015 when the government passed a bill that required models to get a physical and mental medical exam before being hired. After seeing so many models fall for diseases such as anorexia nervosa, France encouraged top brands such as Gucci, Saint Laurent, Vuitton et Dior, and others around the world to lower their model’s body standards.

According to a study conducted by the Model Health Inquiry, it found that “40% of models may currently be suffering from an eating disorder.”

This research may not seem like a great percentage to fret about; however, according to Medical News Today, “the report suggests that there is a growing number of women with hidden eating disorders.”

This is a concern because not all models will open up about their disorders, or don’t know they have one.

Models aren’t the only ones to suffer from eating disorders; their viewers are influenced by them as well. When asked if seeing more “realistic” models work for top brands such as Gucci, Christian Dior, etc. would affect the way they look at themselves, there was a mix of answers.

Erika Klejka, an LTHS junior, answered,“Yes, because all I see are skin thin models which look unhealthy.”

Being skinny isn’t always healthy, but some people have a hard time in gaining weight. This is what Josh Johnson, a Hermitage High School junior, meant when he answered, “No, there’s always going to be a girl who isn’t capable of gaining weight, and that’s going to make her feel left out.”

Since people now are trying to spread body positivity across the world, these two company’s new regulations support that positivity. More diverse models will be seen as fashion icons, not just unrealistic ones.

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5 Comments

5 Responses to “Two fashion brands acknowledge models of different shapes and sizes”

  1. Jennie Alexandros on September 18th, 2017 6:08 pm

    YES

  2. Adriana Watson on September 18th, 2017 7:58 pm

    I absolutely understand the concept of adding more diversity in models, however, I think it’s also a bit unfair to claim that most models have “unrealistic” body types. Although it is true that eating disorders are ubiquitous in every modeling agency, there are even more models who exercise daily and monitor their health very carefully. In other words, even though you typically don’t see it, models work very hard to have good bodies, this is something that sets them apart from regular people. I believe that out of respect for the industry as well as those who work in it, it is much fairer to grant modeling jobs to those who meet this standard. It is also important to note that instead of being “unrealistic” most models have body shapes that are, more accurately, at the pinnacle of health. By advertising very healthy body shapes, one may argue that people will feel more motivated to be healthier and reach a more healthy body size.

  3. Jessica Chavez on September 19th, 2017 10:26 pm

    I agree with you and the article. I mean it isn’t fair to those models who are just naturally a size 0. I understand most people aren’t that size but by having these new requirements may put pressure on these models to gain weight and it may not be healthy for some of them either.

  4. Nancy Rivera on September 20th, 2017 8:48 am

    As long as models are being healthy about their bodies, being size 0 is totally fine. Maybe Kering and LVMH should reconsider their work requirements and just make sure that their models are being healthy about their weight.

  5. Nancy Rivera on September 20th, 2017 8:54 am

    By the way, thank you so much for reading my article and leaving your opinion!:)

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Two fashion brands acknowledge models of different shapes and sizes